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Oklahoma State Has the Leading Rusher and Receiver in the Nation

So far, Chuba and Tylan have been up to the challenge.

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We had to wait until the numbers were tallied at the end of another week of college football, but it’s now official. After three weeks of (mostly) non-conference play, Oklahoma State has the No. 1 rusher and No. 1 receiver in the nation.

Here are your top 10 receivers in yards per game.

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And your top 10 rushers.

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These are astonishing numbers, especially Chuba’s. He’s on pace for nearly 2,300 yards. Even if he doesn’t reach anything close to that unlikely mark, he’s still nearly halfway to a top-20 season in OSU history.

Let’s say he averages a pedestrian 75 yards a game the rest of the way (including the bowl). This is hard to imagine with OSU riding him like Seabiscuit. He would still end the year with 1,271 yards, which would be the 17th-best year in OSU history.

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The yards-per-game numbers are a tad more sobering. Chuba is still currently second to the goat, but he’s not likely to remain there. Here are the 10 best seasons in OSU history in terms of rushing yards per game.

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“I told [our offensive line] all week and all year that they’re the best in the nation,” said Hubbard after posting 256 on the ground against Tulsa. “I truly believe that. Those guys are special. Our offense — we’ve got playmakers — they’re going to double Tylan, and stuff just opened up.”

As for Tylan, last season only one player averaged over 120 a game. Tylan finished third nationally at 115 a game. He’s currently on pace this time around for 1,690 yards, which would be the third-best season for a receiver in OSU history.

The concern here, I suppose, is overworking both horses. And allowing teams to zero in on not what you do best, but the only thing you do. Though Chuba and Tylan have both seemed up to the challenge through three games. It’s not as if Oregon State, Tulsa and McNeese didn’t know who they are. They’ve still posted 911 combined yards (a fitting number) against teams that watched their film.

So while it’s maybe a bit soon to lionize this pair in the OSU record books, it’s not to soon to call them what they’ve been so far in 2019. Oklahoma State’s defense might not be what we want it to be and Spencer Sanders might have a lot of room to grow. But as we head into the end of September, one thing is undeniable. To this point in the season, Oklahoma State has the best WR-RB combo in the country.

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