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Here Are 10 Big 12 Records That May Never Be Broken

From Rashun’s TDs to all those Nebraska rushing attempts.

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The only untouchable college sports record is Robin Ventura’s hitting streak. However, as I was perusing the Big 12 media guide this week — as one is wont to do — I came upon a few Big 12 football records that I have serious doubts about.

Some of them involved Oklahoma State players, some of them don’t. But all of them relate to OSU — at least indirectly — as the Pokes march into another season full of twists and turns.

Heck, last year we thought at multiple points in the season that there was both no way OSU would miss continuing its bowl streak and then no way they would extend it. So who knows what’s going to go down this year in Stillwater (or Norman or Manhattan). But we can at least be pretty sure (probably) that none of the following 10 records are going down in this rendition of Big 12 football.

1. Rushing attempts in a season: 755 (Nebraska in 1997) — For the sake of context, Texas ran it far more than anyone else in the league last year, and they only attempted 569 rushes. That 755 number is laugh-out-loud big. Nebraska had 10 (!) players with at least 10 carries that year, and one of them had nearly 300!

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2. Yards per carry in a game: 12.1 (OSU vs. Baylor in 2011) — Let’s put it this way … Joe Randle had 14 carries for 152 yards and 4 TD, and he was OSU’s least efficient rusher that day.

3. Points in a season: 716 (OU in 2008) — Fifty one point one four a game. They scored 60+ in five straight games to end the season (including against Oklahoma State in Stillwater) before Tim Tebow and Co. got ’em in the title game 24-14.

4. Fewest rushing yards allowed: -48 (OU vs. Baylor in 2006) — I howled when I saw this.

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5. Fewest passing touchdowns allowed: 3 (Texas A&M in 1997) — I think Kansas allowed three during the 2019 season as I typed this sentence. CAN YOU IMAGINE A BIG 12 TEAM ONLY ALLOWING THREE PASSING TDS — NOT IN A GAME OR IN CONFERENCE PLAY — BUT FOR A SEASON?!

6. Rushing yards in a career: 5,540 (Cedric Benson, Texas) — This has less to do with RB talent and more to do with the way the position is handled as a whole. If you’re good enough to do what Benson did as a freshman and sophomore, you’re almost certainly going to the NFL now before your eligibility is exhausted (see: Hill, Justice). And if not, you have to stay healthy for 56 straight games, have your team play 14 a year (somehow) and average 100 a game? Come on.

7. Receiving TDs in a game: 7 (Rashaun Woods vs. SMU in 2003) — The record for passing TDs in a game is only eight. So … yeah. Don’t think this one is getting surpassed anytime soon.

8. Field goal yardage: 65 yards (Martin Gramatica vs. N. Illinois in 1998) — It’s held for 20 years without anyone getting within 2 yards of it. Only two other kickers have hit 60+ yarders.

9. Most rush yards in a game: 427 (Samaje Perine vs. Kansas in 2014) — That’s never falling, right? It’s almost 50 yards more than second place (Troy Davis) and it’s not like running backs are being used more as time goes on. Only three RBs have ever touched 350 yards in a game, and Perine is the only one to do it this century.

10. Most receptions in a career: 349 (Ryan Broyles) — Only four players have more than 260, and Broyles is the only one with more than 305. To contextualize this, Rashaun Woods (Rashaun Woods!) had 293 in his career, and Broyles clipped him by nearly 60. I’m not sure that one is getting caught.

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